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Witness to Inhumanity

A Short Conversation With a Hero, Rufina Amaya

Rufina Amaya survived the massacre of 809 people at El Mozote, El Salvador, on December 11, 1981. She died in March 2007 at the age of sixty-four. She was survived by her few remaining family members and a large host of men and women who admired and supported her. She didn’t consider herself a hero, but a simple woman of faith that does justice. And a woman, a person of love.

Bearing witness! Presente! She bore a lot: the killings of nearly an entire village, including four of her children and her husband, by US trained government thugs, ordered by paranoid leaders who didn’t want their power threatened. The soldiers wrenched Amaya’s two little babies from her arms.

Ronald Reagan’s administration trained and equipped the Salvadoran army whom he called “Freedom Fighters,” and supported a government that Bishop Oscar Romero, at the cost of his own life on March 24, 1980, courageously denounced as perpetrators of gross violations of human rights and the murders of innocent people.

As a spirited response to this savage massacre of human beings, human flowers, Amaya spoke to small groups about her Catholic faith and practice and the need for all, both citizens and their governments, to respect and promote human rights.

May she rest in Ever-Abiding, Light-Bearing Peace.


November 20, 1999 Interview: Fort Benning, Georgia

Rufina emanated an aura of genuine bearing witness to an atrocity, while remaining peaceful and utterly human and humble. I just loved Rufina when I first saw her: light, even in darkness. She had a special beauty, small boned, a round open face, crafted from unbearable suffering met by indomitable spirit. She fixed her hair, pulled back and up into a bun, which stuck straight up. She was slightly chubby; children were extremely attracted to her. She told us she just wanted to tell her story in quiet, righteous anger, calling for real change. She exuded courage, simplicity. and nobility; her voice was strong when she addressed thousands of people at the protests against the School of the Americas (now named Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation).


God saved me because he needed someone to tell the story of what happened.-Rufina Amaya, New York Times, 1996.

MZC: Thanks so much, Rufina. I just feel I’d like to be with you. That feeling of sharing this little moment with you and wanting to support you. You’re wonderful, a light-full inspiration; I pray for you every day.

When the 1981 massacre occurred at El Mozote, with its 809 victims, it was first denied by both the Salvadoran and American governments, despite what many community and church leaders were telling the world. You, being the sole survivor, had the courage to tell what happened in your village of twenty houses facing the community square. You’ve told this story now for eighteen years.

In 1990, you were the first to testify in a criminal complaint against the Atlacatl Battalion (trained by American advisors) by Pedro Chica Romero of La Joya, a nearby hamlet to El Mozote. Pedro was a witness in his little hamlet to another killing of some of his relatives and neighbors by the Atlacatl Battalion. It wasn’t until the El Salvador Peace Treaty of 1992 that an Argentine Forensic Anthropology Team was appointed by the United Nations to excavate the zone and finally begin exhumation.

You have our admiration and love, Rufina.

May I ask you about what motivates you to tell your heart-breaking story?

RA: I feel I’m doing what God wants me to do, what I have all my desire to do. It’s part of how I practice being a Catholic, not a separate activity. My story telling and speaking with people come from my heart and also from my pain, my suffering the loss of my husband, Domingo Claros, who was twenty-nine; my son, Cristino, nine, and my three daughters Maria Dolores, five, Maria Lillian, three; and Maria Isabel, eight months. I can’t even cry anymore. It’s true: my body produced so many tears that they are all gone. I speak to you; I speak for them, my family, my friends, and my neighbors who cannot speak any more. Even though I’m a simple person, I use my voice so people will not forget what happened at El Mozote.

MZC: Just two more questions would be all right? What’s your participation in the organized church? Do you consider yourself an “activist”?

RA: I’m a lay pastor in the Catholic Church in El Salvador; my faith is very important as it gives me love, as do my family and friends. My religion gives me courage not to be afraid to speak out loudly, and my religion allows me to get refreshed spiritually. I like to lead “reflection groups,” where we talk about the relationship of God to our own lives. I’ve had so many visitors from all around the world; I truly feel I’m meant to talk, and I’m happy and serious to talk. I do practice quiet prayer and have some reflection time also, but I would call myself an activist. I’ll never be quiet about what’s right and what’s wrong, what’s unjust abuse, unjust murder against innocent, good people. I’m publicly asking those responsible for the murders to publicly ask our pardon. Yes, I am an activist and also a Catholic. I’m outspoken. I’m not satisfied. Yet, I’m a person of faith too, not only an activist.


Onward to the New World Quest

Base Level: 70
Item(s) (Consumed): 300 Jellopy, 1 Emerald, 1 Ruby
Hunting: 50 Mobster
Base Experience: 1,320,000
Job Experience: 420,000
Quest Reward(s): Access to the New World

1. Talk to the Recruiter for the Brave in the Prontera Castle (prt_castle 83, 67). Tell him you’re interested in his mission, which is to visit a “special place.” He then asks you to visit a Promotional Staff member in Aldebaran.

2. Talk to the Promotional Staff member in Aldebaran (aldebaran 127, 138). As a test, he asks you to bring him 300 Jellopy. After handing over the Jellopy, he asks you to visit a Promotional Staff Member in Geffen.

3. In Geffen, talk to the staff member (geffen 90, 67). He asks you to bring 1 Emerald. After turning it in, he asks you to bring 1 Ruby. Bring him the Ruby, and he sends you to talk to the next staff member in Izlude.

4. In Izlude, talk to the staff member (izlude 99, 136). He tells you that you’ve passed the tests, and to talk to the Recruiter in Prontera Castle again.

5. Return to the Recruiter, who says you are now ready to explore the “Ash-Vacuum” which is an entirely different place from Rune Midgard. He tells you go to to Lighthalzen to register for the United Midgard Alliance.
* Receive 660,000 Base EXP
* Receive 210,000 Job EXP

6. In Lighthalzen, go into Rekenber HQ (lighthalzen 101, 246) and talk to the Guards upstairs (lhz_in01 124, 234), who let you in to register.

7. Talk to Sikaiz at the front of the room, who’s giving a speech.

8. After Sikaiz is finished lecturing, speak to him again and he will tell you about the Ash Vaccum and Satan Morroc’s gateway

9. Speak to him again and he will ask you to inform the Alliance Manager in Rune Midgards that they are ready to depart.

10. The Alliance Manager in Prontera Castle (prt_castle 121, 51) will discuss with you how the kingdom feels about the upcoming expedition.

11. Go back to Sikaiz in Lighthalzen, who tells you about the Three Kingdom’s Alliance and his aide Munkenro. Munkenro interrupts your conversation and you’re asked to deliver a message to the Alliance Manager in Rachel.

12. Find the Arunafeltz Alliance Manager outside the temple (ra_temple 119, 113) and report the status to her.

13. Go back to Sikaiz, who registers you and sends you to talk to some Officers to let them know of your departure. Go downstairs to the banquet hall (147, 179) and talk to them, but first you overhear them plotting to ignore the peace and take control of things for themselves.

14. Report back upstairs, but the guards won’t let you in. Walk to (148, 257), where you’re able to overhear Munkenro talking to someone.

15. Talk to the Guard outside of the lecture hall (lhz_in01 130, 231). Ask it to teleport you immediately to Morroc Field 20 (Continental Guard Quarantine), and talk to the Rift Guard (moc_fild20 349, 179). He takes you to the Dimensional Gorge.

16. From the middle of the right side of the map, go towards the center until you reach Munkenro (moc_fild22b 230, 197). He says Sikaiz has “retired” and that he is now the alliance leader. He also requires you to pass another test, by defeating 50 Mobsters.

17. After passing the test, talk to Munkenro again, who sends you to the Ash-Vacuum.
* Receive 660,000 Base EXP
* Receive 210,000 Job EXP


Few other features are more characteristic of Beowulf than the use of numerous digressions and distinct episodes. While some scholars have made attempts to show that the digressions, or some of them at least, have something in them which is inappropriate to the main narrative and are detrimental to the poetic value of Beowulf, this essay will argue that the digressions and episodes provide a conscious balance and unity and, in fact, contribute to the artistic value of the poem. Beowulf scholar Adrien Bonjour divides the digressions and episodes into four categories: the Scyld episode; digressions concerning Beowulf and the Geats; historical or legendary digressions not connected with Beowulf and the Geats; and Biblical digressions. It is within this structure where we will explore specific digressions and determine their role in the poem.

Before we inspect specific digressions, it is important to provide a brief justification for their presence in general. As Bonjour observes, the poet adeptly uses digressions to add to the coloring of the poem, to serve as a foil to a given situation, to contribute to the historical interest and significance, to provide symbolic value which contributes to the effect and understanding of the poem, and to heighten artistic effect. In addition, the digressions contain welcome information about the hero’s life. It is through digressing that the poet presents the values and perspectives that are to be understood. Action is, after all, only action.

In his division of the digressions and episodes, Bonjour gives the Scyld episode its own category, probably because it is the longest digression from the main narrative in the poem, and possibly because it raises so many questions. At first glance, the opening of the poem with Scyld and the genealogy of the Danish kings seems strangely out of place in a poem about Beowulf, a Geatish hero. But upon further study, a significant parallelism can be found between Scyld and Beowulf. First, both Scyld and Beowulf came miraculously to liberate the Danes. Scyld, being the first liberator in the poem, foreshadows Beowulf who comes later. A second touch of parallelism between the two kings can be found in their inglorious youth. Scyld was found a wretched and abandoned child and Beowulf is conspicuous for his inglorious youth. The striking reversal in their fortunes is clearly stressed by the poet.

Bonjour points out that another artistic purpose in this episode is the glorification of the Scyldings. Had the distressing condition at Heorot served as the only introduction to Beowulf’s mission, this may have created an impression of weakness on the part of the Danes. As we will see later, if the Danes had not been glorified at the beginning of the poem, the greatness of Beowulf may have been diminished.

Finally, the striking contrast of the funeral scenes are endowed with a “symbolic value which heightens the artistic value” and the unity of the entire poem. The beautiful description of Scyld’s funeral suggests a beginning and is the symbol of a glorious future. In contrast, Beowulf’s funeral symbolizes the end of a glorious past while the future is fraught with foreboding.

The Scyld episode allows the poet the use of two of his favorite devices: parallelism and contrast. The contrast between Scyld and Beowulf is perhaps one of the finest artistic achievements in the poem, and the parallelism between the two kings may well be summed up in the legendary epitaph of a cowboy as indicated by J.D.A. Ogilvy and Donald Baker: “Here lies Bronco Bill. He always done his damnedest”.

The next of Bonjour’s categorical divisions regards the digressions concerning Beowulf and the Geats. The first of this group that we will examine is Beowulf’s fight against giants. This digression serves a twofold purpose: it allows the hero his convention of boasting, and it also, however subtly, allies the hero with God. The immediate purpose of this mention of a glorious feat in Beowulf’s early life is to give us an illustration of his uncommon strength, and to give at the same time a justification for his arrival at the Danish court. It also sets Beowulf up as a specialist in fighting monsters: “I came from the fight where I had bound five, destroyed a family of giants…”. The art of boasting is important in an epic hero as it showcases his accomplishments and glorifies his name. As Victor Bromberg denotes, a man’s name is very important in epic poetry because it becomes equal to the sum of his accomplishments.

The second function of this digression is to surreptitiously ally Beowulf with God. When Beowulf pits his strength against the giants, he is unwittingly allying himself with the true God of Christianity. This lends dignity to the heathen hero who, without knowing it, is fighting on the right side after all.

In the Ecgtheow digression we learn that Beowulf’s father has killed Heatholaf, a member of the powerful Wilfing tribe, and has begun a feud from whose consequences the Geats cannot protect him, and he has fled to the court of Hrothgar. Hrothgar, consequently, pays his wergild to the Wilfings. Bonjour asserts that this digression serves two purposes: first, it creates one more bond between Beowulf and the Danes; second, it counterbalances the fact that the Danes are accepting help from Beowulf.

The Unferth episode serves primarily as a foil to emphasize Beowulf’s greatness. In spite of the sinister overtones of Unferth’s reputation, the poet also shows him as a distinguished thane. Had Unferth been reduced to a mere swashbuckler, Beowulf’s superiority over him would not have meant so much as it actually does. In his essay “Beowulf: The monsters and the Critics”, Professor J.R.R. Tolkien suggests that Beowulf’s conquest of the nicors in his youth are referred to [in this digression] as a presage to the kind of hero we are dealing with. Beowulf’s answer to Unferth’s criticism also establishes him as a man to reckon with in words as well as with his sword. So, from this digression we learn Beowulf’s qualifications for cleansing Heorot, and also that the hero is not only a great warrior, but a man capable of delivering a coup de grâce in a battle of wits.

Bonjour notes that the first allusion in the poem to the fall of Hygelac gives us a fine instance of a particular use of contrast characteristic of Beowulf. It is ironic that the first hint of Hygelac’s fall should be called up by the description of the treasures given to Beowulf by Queen Wealtheow after Beowulf’s victory over Grendel. It looks as if there are already some implications of the same nature as those to be met with in the Dragon story where, as Bonjour remarks, the beauty of the treasure of the Dragon’s hoard stands out in contrast to the curse attached to it. Here, the necklace is among “[the finest] under the heavens”, yet Hygelac had it when he was slain.

Next, we will look at the digression on Beowulf’s inglorious youth and Heremod’s tragedy in conjuntion with one another. Heremod’s tragedy actually falls outside the structure proposed by Adrien Bonjour as it has nothing to do with Beowulf and the Geats directly. However, we will bring the Heremod digression out of the proposed structure since it provides such an important contrast to Beowulf’s inglorious youth.

The short digression on Beowulf’s inglorious youth is but another touch that contributes to the glorification of the hero. The inglorious youth heightens the effect of his later glorious deeds and makes them all the more remarkable by way of contrast. But this digression reaches its full effect when contrasted with the tragedy of Heremod. In Hrothgar’s speech to Beowulf, we learn that Heremod was a strong, valiant hero whose career showed great promise, but that he subsequently proved to be a bad ruler. Beowulf, on the other hand, is first despised but he has now grown into a glorious hero. Heremod’s tragedy redefines, though negatively, what a good king should be. Thus we have a poor beginning (by Beowulf) followed by a prodigious ascent contrasted with a brilliant promise (by Heremod) ending in a miserable downfall.

The next digression to be examined concerns Hygelac’s death in Friesland and Beowulf’s return by swimming and his subsequent guardianship of Heardred. The poet tells us how Beowulf escapes from Friesland, where Hygelac is slain, by swimming back to his country with thirty to panoplies of armour on his arm. Obviously, this part of the digression serves to further glorify Beowulf’s extraordinary abilities. Later, we learn that Beowulf turns down Queen Hygd’s offer of the Geatish throne in favor of acting as counsel to Heardred, the rightful heir. Beowulf’s refusal of the crown illustrates his moral greatness. Here, the Geats present a striking contrast to the Danes. Ogilvy and Baker suggest that unlike Wealtheow, who is obsessed with securing the succession of her sons to the throne, Hygd asks Beowulf to take the throne in favor of her own son for the good of the people. This contrast is made even greater when compared to the situation at the Danish court where Hrothulf seizes his uncle’s throne. The story of the Danish succession serves as a foil: on the one side we have a treacherous usurpation, and on the other, a refusal to accept the crown out of sheer loyalty. Along with the glorification of Beowulf, this digression brings the theme of loyalty to the forefront.

In seeking the Dragon’s den, Beowulf makes a long speech in which he looks back over his life from the time when, at the age of seven, he came to the court of his grandfather, King Hrethel. The immediate purpose of Beowulf’s long speech appears to be a pause so that the hero can gather strength and resolution by looking back over a life of valiant deeds. But this digression goes much deeper when we read into King Hrethel’s angst over his eldest son, Herebeald, who is accidentally slain by his brother Hæthcyn. The accidental killing suggests the inexorability of wyrd (fate), and on the other hand, the poignant lament of Hrethel prepares the dominant mood of the end of the poem (Bonjour 34). This thematic “Christian” acceptance of earthly woes anticipates the rationale of Beowulf’s actions. He, too, will accept his fate. Bonjour states that the appearance of wyrd here is of great importance as it gives us the keynote of not only the digression, but of the whole ending of the poem.

The Last Survivor’s Speech is an elegy cut from the same cloth: “Baleful death has sent away many races of men”. Tolkien states that here, the poet is handling an ancient theme: that man, each man and all men, and all their works shall die.

In the short digression on Weohstan (Wiglaf’s father) and his slaying of Eanmund, we learn of the history of Wiglaf’s sword. The primary purpose of this digression is to give us something of Wiglaf’s pedigree, and to establish that Wiglaf is not ordinary, he is of the same blood as Beowulf. The establishing of Wiglaf’s history is important, because if this part were played by any other Geat, Beowulf’s heroic courage would appear to have been matched by an ordinary human. Also, there is a definite parallel between Wiglaf’s loyalty to Beowulf, and Beowulf’s loyalty to Hygelac.

The last digression that we will look at in this division deals again with Hygelac’s fall and the battle at Ravenswood. Since Hygelac’s raid, the enmity between Franks and Geats has remained. The Swedes are not to be trusted either since Beowulf’s death is likely to rekindle their memory of the feud between them and the Geats. With the opening of this last digression, Bonjour observes that the poet allows us to catch a glimpse of what the future has in store for the Geats. Plainly, the author is using Wiglaf’s messenger as a means to foreshadow the fate that awaits the Geatish nation.

The third category of digressions concerns historical or legendary digressions not directly connected with Beowulf and the Geats. The first digression in this category concerns the fate of Heorot. No sooner has the poet described the glorious building of Heorot than he concludes, “it would wait for the fierce flames of vengeful fire”. The allusion is to the feud between Ingeld and Hrothgar. This illustrates another example of the poet telling his story with a kind of structural irony which alternates prosperous with tragic events. Here, William Alfred remarks that Hrothgar is set up as the heroic king of a loyal comitatus, but suddenly, what begins as a description of the impressive halls of Heorot breaks down into an account of its destruction by fire in a feud. On this point, Bonjour mentions that the contrast inherent between a harmonious situation and a brief intimation of disaster adds to the impression of melancholy in which so much of the poem is steeped.

After Beowulf has killed Grendel, a scop improvises a lay in honor of Beowulf and compares him to Sigemund and Heremod. Sigemund was a great slayer of monsters and the greatest adventurer since the unfortunate Heremod. Beowulf, they say, is comparable to Sigemund. Sigemund and Heremod are inroduced to give us a standard of comparison for Beowulf. Bonjour surmises that this whole digression is certainly intended to praise the hero.

The next digression we will examine begins abruptly as Beowulf is returning home from Hrothgar’s court. We are given a description of Hygelac’s court before Beowulf’s arrival, and here begins the digression. The passage is devoted to a comparison between Hygd, Hygelac’s queen, and Modthryth, queen of Offa, king of the Angles before their migration to England. At first glance, Modthryth may seem, like Heremod, to be merely a bad character introduced to heighten the virtues of a good one (Hygd) by contrast. Modthryth, however, is more complex than that. She begins as a cruel and tyrannous princess, but redeems herself once on the Anglican throne at Offa’s side. This opposition provides a connecting link between this episode and Heremod’s tragedy. However, the respective careers of Heremod and Modthryth run exactly opposite courses. This digression serves several purposes: Modthryth serves as a foil to Hygd; the connection to Heremod again stresses the “abuse of power” theme, and Modthryth’s beginning could also be viewed as a parallel to Beowulf’s inglorious youth; an unsavory beginning which blossoms into a glorious end.

We will examine the Finn and Ingeld episodes together since the parallelism between the two is unmistakable. The Finn episode is an account of a blood-feud between the Danes and the Frisians. Hnæf’s sister, Hildeburh is a Danish princess who was married to King Finn of the Frisians in order to bring an end to the feud. The peace, however, is short-lived and the Finn episode points directly to the theme of the precarious truce between the two peoples. The prophetic telling of the tale of Ingeld by Beowulf suggests that the martial alliance between the Danish princess, Freawaru, and Ingeld, prince of the Heathobards will yield similar results. Bonjour claims that the central theme of the two episodes is exactly the same, that tribal enmity sooner or later sweeps away all attempts at human compromise. Indeed, this also proves to be a central theme of the entire poem.

The final category in which to make note is the digressions of Biblical character. Owing to their Christian element, the Song of Creation as well as the allusion to the Giants’ war against God and the allusions to Cain all take a front row seat.

The Song of Creation appears almost simultaneously with the introduction of Grendel, “There he spoke who could relate the beginning of men far back in time, said that the Almighty made earth…”. The Song of Creation goes back to the Biblical account in Genesis. Its immediate purpose is clear enough-it is a matter of contrast. The rare note of joy in the beauty of nature contrasts deeply with the melancholy inspired by the dreary abode of Grendel.

We will now look at the allusions to Cain and the Giants, and in doing so, it is important to note that the monsters are presented from two points of view. To the pagan characters, these creatures are eotenas [giants], and scuccan [evil spirits]-all terms from Germanic demonology. But the poet in his own voice tells us of the true genealogy of the Grendelkin: they are the monstrous descendents of Cain. This two-leveled portrayal of the monsters places them on one level like the dragon that Sigemund slew, and on another level it has connotations of Satanic evil which the Bible invests in them. At this point, new Scripture and old tradition unite.

The destruction of the Giants is said to be carved on the hilt of the magic sword which allows Beowulf to slay Grendel’s mother. Beowulf’s fight is now felt to partake of the struggle between the powers of good and evil. We were told earlier that both monsters were of the same kind as the Giants, but as Bonjour shows, we now know that God himself actually helps the hero by directing his attention to the magic sword which depicted God’s own action against the accursed race. Now, it is almost as if Beowulf has been raised to the rank of God’s own champion. Beowulf, for all that he moves in the world of the primitive Heroic Age, nevertheless is [for a moment] almost a Christian knight.

Bonjour concludes that Beowulf, once in the position of a king actually transcends the picure of an ideal king by sacrificing his life for his people, the significance of which is stressed by the very contrast with Hrothgar’s own attitude towards Grendel. But Hrothgar is already the figure of an ideal king, so now it becomes easier to compare Beowulf to the Savior, the self-sacrificing king, the prototype of supreme perfection.

Scholar B.J. Timmer sees the form of the poem as a failure because of the poet’s compromise in an attempt to glorify both pagan and Christian elements. John Leyerle echos this view when he describes the theme of the poem as “the fatal contradiction at the core of heroic society” in which the impelling code demands for the hero individual achievement and glory, whereas society demands a king who achieves for the common good. But why should there be a necessary separation here? Would it not require a heroic individual to achieve for the common good? The Beowulf poet, rightly, does not perform this separation.

In conclusion, it should be stated that whether or not we admire the digressions, we should recognize that they are part of the poet’s method, not the results of ineptitude. Here, I agree with Bonjour that the links of the digressions and episodes to the main story are extremely varied but, as we have seen, they are all links of relevance that weave the main theme and its background into an elaborate tapestry. Theodore M. Anderson sums up the significance of the digressions when he writes:

The poet drew his settings from the scenic repertory of the older heroic
lay, but he strung the traditional scenes together with a moralizing
commentary in the form of digressions, flashbacks, boasts, reflective
speeches, and a persistent emphasis on unexpected reversals-all tending
to underscore the peaks and valleys of human experience.

A good dose of common sense should expel any lingering beliefs, on the part of skeptics, that the poet’s digressions are reckless or that they diminish the value of the poem. As we have seen in this essay, there are simply too many instances of foreshadowing, careful contrast, and parallelism for the digressions to have been carelessly thrown into the mix. So, we shall draw the conclusion that behind all the digressions is found a definite artistic design clear enough to allow us to agree with Bonjour that each one plays a useful part in the poem. In other words, we have found that all of the digressions, in varying degrees, are artistically justified.


The act of stimulating the prostate gland in order for men to reach orgasm or ejaculate is called prostate milking. This could be done for medical reasons or just for the fun and pleasure that it brings. We must understand what prostate milking is first before we tackle more about the topic.

Let’s talk about the medical reasons first, medical doctors have used this technique to relieve the pain felt by the people who have prostate disorder. They also use prostate milking when they need to get a semen sample from paralyzed patients. They soon discovered that there are more benefits that could be reaped from performing prostate milking though. One of those said benefits is the less chance of acquiring prostate cancer.

How does this work?

The doctors explained that when men ejaculate or have orgasm in the normal way, not all of the semen gets released. There are traces of the semen left behind and given the right situation; those could develop into prostate cancer. I am not saying that these residues are the only culprit to having prostate cancer. I am merely saying that they contribute to the chance of having one.

Let us move on to something much fun. As I have mentioned earlier, another reason for prostate milking could be because of the ecstatic feeling that it brings to us men and for some couples alike. Though it may be considered taboo, we cannot deny the fact that it really brings a higher level of satisfaction.

Many couples have even testified that performing the act not only gives men pleasure but it also brings great pleasure for both parties. Having this in mind, did you know that there are different positions in performing this? Do you know what position works for you? If you are not familiar with the different positions of prostate milking then let me teach you some. You could determine later what works for you. Mind you, there are some things you must remember before doing any of these positions.

First of all, prostate milking could be done either by only you or with the help of your partner. Second, you have the liberty of using your fingers or an adult toy. Just make sure to lubricate before inserting anything. Lastly, have proper hygiene when performing this because you would have to touch or apply pressure in sensitive areas. Read on and enjoy.

• PROSTATE MILKING POSITION 1: STANDARD FETAL POSITION. Do this by lying on your side and bending your knees. Place your knees as close to your stomach as possible. By being in this position, you could easily reach for your anus or your perineum.

• PROSTATE MILKING POSITION 2: LIE ON YOUR BACK AND LIFT YOUR LEGS. Insert your finger or your toy before you proceed to be on this position. Also remember that you have to do this slowly so as not to cause any damage to the membranes inside your anus. You could also place padding underneath the small of your back so that you would be more comfortable in the position.

• PROSTATE MILKING POSITION 3: ON ALL FOURS. You could start by kneeling on a soft surface. You could either do this on the bed or anywhere that you may fancy. You could experiment on this position. You could try stretching your hands farther away in front of you. You could also try and arch your back for a bit.

There are still other positions for prostate milking that you could try. Your imagination and your creativity would be the only limits. Bear in mind that though pleasure is good, it is still better to on the safe side of things.


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